July 27, 2017

Update on Fecal Transplants

I have now done 15 days of the Fecal Transplants. This is a much longer course than some people recommend, however I believe it might be necessary considering what they root cause might be.

Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) bacteria has been implicated as a likely cause of Crohn’s disease and it might also be a cause of Ulcerative Colitis as well. If this is the source of my troubles then it could take a long time to knock it out since this kind of bacteria reproduces from impenetrable spores. This bacteria has to be knocked out while it is active before it can produce more spores. However if I have enough good bacteria which can kill off MAP while active then each successive flare or bloom cycle will hopefully have less bacteria and less severe symptoms for a shorter period of time.

Otherwise I am continuing the daily infusions although I have had another flare that I am going to get some Prednisone to take care of.  I have come to believe that for the infusions to be effective something needs to be done to first take care of the inflammation and slow down the number of bowel movements per day.

The way to do this I think is to prophylactically use the anti-diarrhea drug Immodium by taking it every four hours. Take it a half hour to hour before each meal and before the infusions.  Controlling diarrhea will help give the “good” bacteria from the infusions a chance to become established and to start to fight off the MAP bacteria. Low residue, water-soluble fiber from benefiber or oat meal or other foods with water soluble fiber can help.

I have also discovered that the infusions seem to cause significant gas and bloating as well. The gases could be from the new bacteria killing off existing bacteria.  So I have also been using anti-gas pills, generic Gas-X.

However in spite of these other steps I am also going to go back on Prednisone for the time being since it has been the fastest way to get a flare under control in my experience up till now.

 

 

 

Comments

  1. I have UC. doc mentioned Fecal Implant. Wanted me to try it. Hesitation on my part. Read info on SKY’s site. Can a person still go to work while doing these infusions? I cannot take off work or I will lose my job. it’s that simple. I can probably do the FMLA, but the HR people are guarding the facts about that.

    Plain and simple, will it make me ill, feverish? Will I be able to work as an Administrative Assistant or is it too risky?

    • Yes, you can still go to work while doing these. Do the Fecal Transplant when you have the time to retain it for as long as possible, at least an hour and a half. For this reason I recommend night time before going to bed. You may even be able to sleep through the night or wake up at some point to go the bathroom and then back to sleep.

  2. FWIW, mycobacteria are not spore formers. But, then again, MAP probably doesn’t cause Crohn’s disease; it’s hard to understand why treatments like TNF drugs don’t kill the host if MAP causes Crohn’s, because other mycobacteria (like tuberculosis) can do so as TNF takes out a big chunk of the immune system. Pretty much any infection becomes worse with TNF drugs, but Crohn’s and colitis get *better* with TNF drugs. Plus, best as I can tell, there are no documented cases of MAP ever killing someone. We’re supposed to believe that out of 400,000+ sufferers in the United States alone, nobody has ever been killed by MAP? Just nearly-killed-to-death by Crohn’s? Doesn’t make sense.

    Similarly, none of the antibiotics commonly prescribed for Crohn’s or colitis are effective on mycobacteria. There’s no reason they should make the disease better.

    Lastly, MAP is a facultative intracellular pathogen; there’s no reason the disease course should be altered by the contents of the intestine. But we see that enteral diets and total parenteral nutrition are highly effective at inducing remission. This should not be possible if MAP is responsible for Crohn’s and/or colitis.

    You’re doing great work. Thanks for the website, and I appreciate knowing all the things you’re figuring out.

    • You make some good points. I don’t know exactly what causes this although I do know of the ongoing debate about Mycobacteria being the cause. I do know that anti-biotics like Cipro and Vancomycin appeared to be what brought about remission several times. Prednisone also appeared to help many times and the anti-TNFa drug Remicade also seemed to help. Why do drugs that suppress or modify immune response sometimes help? And why do they not make Crohn’s or Colitis worse to the point of causing death? Good question. Maybe the immune response is sometimes part of the problem. Maybe psychological stress / distress is a part of the problem. I think there is a feedback loop of sorts, and I think whether or not Myco bacteria is involved there could be other bacteria or bacterial balance that is part of the problem.

      Why do some diets seem to help? Maybe it is because the body lacks bacteria or digestive enzymes to help break down certain foods, especially in the midst of a flare. Maybe the intestinal once damaged is much more susceptible to more damage than it would be if it were healthy. Maybe damaged intestinal lining allows pathogens into the body through the barrier that would otherwise protect it and this triggers a cycle of inflammation. I do know bowel rest also helps, this is one reason why a liquid elemental diet could help or even the first stage of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet since it starts with broth, well cooked soup stew.

      I don’t think anyone say with certainty all that is going with these illnesses, or even to what extent the causes of the illness or the course it takes can vary from one person to the next. I can say that what I did worked. I do know that anti-depressant drugs help limit diarrhea, perhaps by alleviating psychological stress that contributes to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). This limiting of diarrhea and calming of the gut can help the body repair the intestinal lining, aid absorption of key nutrients, help immune response and help certain potentially positive bacteria to colonize.

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  1. themselves says:

    themselves…

    Hi there, just wanted to mention, I enjoyed this article. It was inspiring. Keep on posting!…

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